abstract of grass
My first discovery was a hummingbird in the grass. He was playing tricks on me though, along with the multiple exposure setting on my camera, and made me think I was seeing triple.

Get lost with your camera to find creativity.

On a road trip in our camper van last month, my wife and I decided to take a break from driving and enjoy a relaxing morning at our campsite near Quesnel. She settled in with a book while I grabbed my camera. Looking around, there appeared to be absolutely nothing calling for my attention. Not a problem.

With my macro lens attached to the camera, I walked to the edge of the campsite and sat in the brush. And got lost.

And that’s when I found so much more than expected.

Getting lost is my favourite place to be. Just me, my camera and whatever I find. You know you’re lost when you lose track of time, are oblivious to the activity nearby and continue to discover new, exciting things as you explore through the lens. It’s a joyful time.

So, without having a subject in mind, I poke my camera into the chaos of grass, weeds and wildflowers, just looking. With a macro lens on, everything takes on a new view and I see things not visible to the casual eye. And then the gifts appear before me. And ideas come and creativity grows.

Here are a few of the things I found while lost.

abstract image of dead blooms
These dried up old blooms didn’t seem too photogenic until I created a pattern with the multiple exposure setting.
up close with a dandelion
A common dandelion is a scourge to gardeners but a beautiful site when seen up close.
close up of a fly
My exploration was interrupted by this neighbourly fellow who dropped in for a visit. And then he buzzed off.
I had another visitor, this one from outer space. He was quite cooperative and held very still for the camera.
I had another visitor, this one from outer space. He was quite cooperative and held very still for the camera.
spider web abstract
Deep in the shade, which contributed the blue cast, was an abandoned spider’s web. Thanks to a little breeze, the lines had a beautiful curve. Such a delightful find.
Light patterns on spider web
The spider web kept me busy for a while, looking at it from every angle and enjoying how the light refracted through the silk.
Who knew that a rainbow could be found on an old spiders web. Great things are to be found when you're lost.
Who knew that a rainbow could be found on an old spiders web. Great things are to be found when you’re lost.
abstract of web
To celebrate all the joyful discoveries while lost, some fireworks seemed appropriate.
bunchberry multiple exposure
Not everything needed a macro lens. A gift of bunchberry flowers is always welcome.
Wild Rose multiple exposure
Wild roses are so common in the summer and this one hoped it wouldn’t be overlooked.
A space with nothing to photograph yields photographic treasures.
And this is the space beside the campground that had nothing to photograph! Until, of course, one looks a little deeper.

For Photographers

When I first began to learn about photography, in the film days, I always used a tripod for my macro photos. Probably it was the cost of film that had me trying to get every picture right with just a couple of frames. I still use a tripod for many things but I seldom use one anymore for macro photography. Instead, lying on the ground and poking my lens into the growth offers so much more freedom to discover the treasures.

My other useful tool is a set of extension tubes. For most of these shots, I used the smallest of the three rings that come with my extension tubes. These allow me to focus much closer to the subject and fill my frame.

And finally, I’m so addicted to the look of a shallow depth of field. Most of the time, my aperture is at f/2.8, creating a beautiful soft blur in the background.

Related Posts